writing

Building a new character

Start Writing Fiction | Week 6

This week’s coursework, from the online course listed above, brought the opportunity to build one of my main characters more on paper. There is still room for growth, but it gave me a great start.

Physical/biological: age, height, size, state of health, assets, flaws, sexuality, gait, voice.

Mia is a 14 year old female who is a freshman in high school. She looks a lot like her young mom: 5’5” with brown tiger eyes that draw you into a pretty face, and petite 125 lb body. She uses a dark eyeliner application that shows off her long eyelashes, and she maintains her blonde hair highlights with straight hair that falls over the shoulder. She is soft spoken, and usually hides behind her notebook that she journals poetry or thoughts throughout the day. Her wardrobe of choice is jeans and sneakers with a black tank and black hoodie. Her smartphone usually goes in her hoodie pocket, or gets stashed in her backpack while at school. Never carries a purse, just a notebook. Mia is interested in boys, and now that she’s in high school they are starting to catch her attention as her mom has dialed up the sex talk more and more recently. She is usually questioning another character in return or avoiding the answer somehow. Typical teenager?

Psychological: intelligence, temperament, happiness/unhappiness, attitudes, self-knowledge, unconscious aspects.

Mia is not doing well in school because she is not applying herself in class or completing homework outside of class. Writing poetry in her notebook makes her happy, so that is what she focuses on in her free time. Her mom is usually never home, and if she is she’s holed up drinking in her bedroom closet. Mia feels empathetic towards her mother and takes care of her when she is at her lowest with men and alcohol. She longs to have a father, and has seen many men come-and-go dating her mom. She takes out her pain and frustration in her notebook, so using words out loud is harder for her. She is usually quick and to the point when she speaks, but most times too soft to be heard and is cut off.

Interpersonal/cultural: family, friends, colleagues, birthplace, education, hobbies, beliefs, values, lifestyle.

Mia lives with her mom in her deceased grandparents’ home, a ranch mansion. She was nearly five years old when her grandma and grandpa tragically passed away in a car accident. While that shapes a lot of her lifestyle today, she refuses to speak about her grandparents being dead with her mom. Mia has no relation with her dad, he is not in the picture and never has been. She longs for a male relationship that is father-like. While she is failing all other classes, she is excelling in English. It’s an easy class for her, and her English teacher is pushing her to be a better writer. He pushes her like a father would.

Personal history: major events in their life, including the best and the most traumatic times.

Mia was raised by her grandparents in her infant years, while her mom homeschooled to finish high school. Mia was almost five, and she was living with her mom (who was taking college classes) in a small 2 bedroom apartment, when her grandparents visited to lecture her mom about failing or dropping college classes…and it was that night they got into a fatal accident. Her mom did not go back to college, but almost immediately moved them into the ranch mansion and they were set with finances through trust funds and life insurance. Life seemed more normal living at grandma and grandpa’s house, surrounded with rooms of old items and bookshelves full of books. But, Mia was alone in her room a lot so she would create stories of her own that include imaginary friends and imaginary grandparents. Mom is boss, and when she comes around for discussion or consolation—Mia drops what she’s doing to make mom feel like number one.

Portraying your character—in the 3rd person.

Mia is like a very delicate flower, but her roots are strong and hold her up. She prefers the shade, or shys away from the sun as a retreat to her notebook where she writes. She has raised herself, as her young mother is very absent. As soon as Mia was old enough to write, she would write stories in her notebook about traveling around the world with imaginary friends–just like the stories her grandparents used to tell her about their travels.

Straight blonde highlighted hair falls over her shoulders, dark eyeliner shows off her long eyelashes and when she bats her eyes at you, her brown tiger eyes stare back longingly. Her pretty face and petite body gets her a second glance from most guys when she is noticed in the highschool lineup. Who is this freshman girl? Her wardrobe is basic, and when she takes off her black sweatshirt to reveal a black tank, with jean capris and sneakers, it seems like she has a fashion-forward maturity level of basic beauty.

She sat on the edge of her bed, hunched over, leaning into her notebook–scribbling away. She was writing words of love and wishes for intimacy. She hears a sob outside her bedroom door, so Mia closes her notebook and opens her door to find her mom with her hands over her face, mascara running down her fingers, “Mom, what’s wrong?” asked Mia, as she gave her mom a big hug.

Mom lowered her hands away from her face and she drunkenly muttered, “I just–it was–”

“Another bad night?” Mia asked sternly, and with that: mom raised her hands to her face and started sobbing again. Mia took a step back and continued her stern voice, “I don’t think you’re dating the right guys, and you’re trying way too hard. It shouldn’t be this difficult–”

“Difficult to what?!” Mom snapped back, “find true love? I don’t think I’ll be taking advice from my teenage daughter, who just writes about true love.”

“Grandma and Grandpa were true love! I’ve seen it too!” Mia raised her voice back, and then slammed her bedroom door and retreated back to her bed. In the hunched over position, she leaned into her hands and cried softly into them.

Meet the Main Characters HERE

3 thoughts on “Building a new character”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s